Advanced Needs

Breakdown of Advanced Needs Offered

High Performance Endorsement

If you are moving up in aircraft and require a “High Performance Endorsement”, then we can help. Often your insurance company has specific requirements to qualify to act as Pilot In Command (PIC) in your specific aircraft. These requirements may include a high performance endorsement as well as a minimum number of flight hours in the aircraft.

The FAR’s (Federal Aviation Regulations) require you to have a high-performance endorsement in order to act as pilot-in-command (PIC) of a high-performance airplane. Any airplane with an engine of more than 200 horsepower is considered “high-performance.” The engines are evaluated individually (horsepower ratings are not added together) for multi-engine aircraft.

The FAA does not require a special check ride or knowledge test to earn the endorsement, but rather, the logbook endorsement is achieved through ground and flight training after demonstrating your proficiency. If you have logged PIC time in high-performance airplanes prior to August 4, 1997, you are grandfathered in and don’t need the endorsement.
FAR 14 CFR 61.31(f): Additional training required for operating high-performance airplanes

  1. Except as provided in paragraph (f)(2) of this section, no person may act as pilot in command of a high-performance airplane (an airplane with an engine of more than 200 horsepower), unless the person has;

(i) Received and logged ground and flight training from an authorized instructor in a high performance airplane, or in a flight simulator or flight training device that is representative of a high performance airplane, and has been found proficient in the operation and systems of the airplane; and

(ii) Received a one-time endorsement in the pilot’s logbook from an authorized instructor who certifies the person is proficient to operate a high-performance airplane.

(2) The training and endorsement required by paragraph (f)(1) of this section is not required if the person has logged flight time as a pilot in command of a high-performance airplane, or in a flight simulator or flight training device that is representative of a high-performance airplane prior to August 4, 1997.

Ground and Flight High Performance Endorsement Training

Ground:

Ground instruction for the high-performance endorsement is focused on aircraft systems and best practices for flying high-performance aircraft. During your ground training for your high performance endorsement, you will learn about the additional importance of planning and judgment, as well as the skills required to operate a high performance aircraft. Special emphasis will be given to;

  • calculating performance
  • weight & balance
  • aeromedical factors and
  • high altitude operation

 

Flight:

Since you will be flying aircraft that have faster operating speeds, better climb rates, improved takeoff performance, and more complicated systems than you may be used to, your Murfreesboro Aviation flight instructor will ensure that you become familiar with the requirements to safely handle this high performance environment.

Typically, you will need between 5 and 10 flight hours depending on your experience and the type of aircraft flown.

High performance training may be combined with complex airplane training if the aircraft meets both definitions.

Complex

In order to pilot a complex aircraft, as Pilot-In-Command (PIC) the FAA requires you to have a complex airplane endorsement. In a complex aircraft, you have more systems, more to attend to, more to think about, and things happen faster. You’ll now have to handle a variable pitch prop, retractable gear, and more detailed emergency procedures. It is for these reasons that the FAA requires an endorsement. The instruction will teach you to handle these demands systematically and procedurally.

What is a “complex airplane”?

The FAA defines a complex airplane as this;
FAR 14 CFR 61.1(b)(3): Definition of “complex airplane”
Complex airplane means an airplane that has a retractable landing gear, flaps, and a controllable pitch propeller, including airplanes equipped with an engine control system consisting of a digital computer and associated accessories for controlling the engine and propeller, such as a full authority digital engine control; or, in the case of a seaplane, flaps and a controllable pitch propeller, including seaplanes equipped with an engine control system consisting of a digital computer and associated accessories for controlling the engine and propeller, such as a full authority digital engine control.

In order to receive your complex endorsement you do not have to take a checkride or knowledge test. Your instructor will give you the endorsement after you complete the training and can demonstrate your proficiency in the aircraft and have demonstrated your knowledge regarding the information taught.

If you have logged PIC time in complex aircraft prior to August 4, 1997, you are grandfathered in and do not require the endorsement.
FAR 14 CFR 61.31(e): Additional training required for operating complex airplanes
(1) Except as provided in paragraph (e)(2) of this section, no person may act as pilot in command of a complex airplane, unless the person has…

(i) Received and logged ground and flight training from an authorized instructor in a complex airplane, or in a flight simulator or flight training device that is representative of a complex airplane, and has been found proficient in the operation and systems of the airplane;

(ii) Received a one-time endorsement in the pilot’s logbook from an authorized instructor who certifies the person is proficient to operate a complex airplane.

(2) The training and endorsement required by paragraph (e)(1) of this section is not required if the person has logged flight time as pilot in command of a complex airplane, or in a flight simulator or flight training device that is representative of a complex airplane prior to August 4, 1997.

 

Complex Endorsement Ground Training

Ground instruction for the complex endorsement is focused on aircraft systems and best practices for flying complex aircraft. Special emphasis is placed on the design and function of retractable landing gear and controllable-pitch propellers. Time will also be spent reviewing the operating limitations and emergency procedures for these systems.

Insurance

Insurance requirements for flight can be more restrictive than FAA requirements. While you may be qualified to fly an aircraft, your insurance company may require additional PIC hours, additional dual instruction, or more hours in type. Whatever your need, Murfreesboro Aviation can assist. We have a fleet of aircraft insured and understand that these requirements may seem frustrating at times. But we also understand that the requirements mandated by insurance companies are based on statistics and actual experience.

Our philosophy is to meet the requirements rather than argue to become frustrated by them. We advise this for you. Let us know how we can help. If you need additional dual instruction, type hours, or a safety pilot for a specific trip, just give us a call and we’ll help you reach your hours and stay safe. After all, safety is the ultimate goal!

Familiarization Training

What is familiarization training?

Sometimes a pilot has a valid type rating, but does not have any experience in a variant within that rating. Or perhaps you have experience in a certain type of aircraft but no experience in a similar but different model aircraft. For example, perhaps you have time flying a Cessna 337 but have never flown a Cessna 310, or you have experience flying low wing Pipers, but none in high wing Cessna’s. Rather than jumping in an aircraft and just “figuring it out” (never a good policy), it might be best to fly with someone who has experience in the aircraft to assist you in becoming familiar with the plane (i.e. “Familiarization Training”).

Familiarization training starts in the classroom and later moves to the cockpit. The time it takes for you to become comfortable and competent will depend on many factors but typically the training can be from hours to just a few days. Later, as you move into jets and more complex aircraft, the time required to complete your training will likely increase.

Why do you need familiarization training?

Give us a call and let us know what you need!

Pinch-Hitter* Course

So what in the world is a “pinch-hitter*” course?

If you are not a pilot, but fly frequently in a private aircraft, have you ever asked yourself; “what would I do if my pilot becomes sick, unconscious, or incapacitated during our flight?”

Enter the pinch-hitter* course!…

A pinch-hitter course is for people who are not pilots but would like to know what to do in the event their pilot becomes sick, unconscious, or otherwise incapacitated during flight. Wouldn’t it feel good knowing that in this instance, you are not doomed? Wouldn’t it be nice to know what is the most important thing to do first, how to make contact with someone on the ground who can help you, and how to keep the aircraft flying safely while you are securing help? You bet it would be nice! Murfreesboro Aviation can teach you.

Who is a typical pinch-hitter* client?

  • A spouse who frequently flies alone with their spouse
  • An employee who flies with a company pilot
  • A teenage child who flies with their Mom or Dad
  • A businessperson who charters single-pilot flown aircraft
  • A parent who often flies with their adult child

*Registered trademark of AOPA Air Safety Foundation.

Questions?

Contact Us!